Posts Tagged ‘peninsula radiology’

Early Screenings for Early Lung Cancer Detection

Early Screenings for Early Lung Cancer DetectionGenerally, chest x-rays are used to diagnose patients who already show signs of lung cancer. Many times, the disease has already reached an advanced stage by the time it is discovered. However, patients at high risk for lung cancer can now get early detection screenings which will help discover any signs of lung cancer before symptoms develop.

Who Is High Risk?

There are a few factors that come into play when deciding who is a candidate for lung screenings. In order to be considered, the patient must meet the following requirements:

  • Current or former smoker
  • AND in the age group from 55 to 74 years
  • AND with a smoking history of at least 30 pack-years (this means one pack a day for 30 years, two packs a day for 15 years, etc.)

Other factors may come into play, and the risk of lung cancer is different for every person, so be sure to discuss early screenings with your doctor.

The Process

The screening process is fast–just a few seconds is all it takes. In order to acquire the most accurate image, patients are asked to hold their breath while the x-ray is taken. Following the x-ray, the patient will meet with a specialist to review the screening. If the result is negative, it is recommended to go in for another screening once a year for the next two years. Also, it is highly recommended to quit smoking during that time (or before, for that matter). If the result of the screening is positive, additional tests or follow-ups will be required to determine if it is lung cancer or another problem altogether.

Screening is not a substitute for quitting smoking. The most effective way anyone can reduce their risk of lung cancer is to avoid tobacco. Riverside offers Smokeless®, a program to help people quit smoking on the Peninsula. For information and help to quit smoking, call Holly Hicks at (757) 875-7533.

 

Visit us online to schedule an appointment near you!

Ultrasounds: What They Are and When You Should Get One

Ultrasounds: What They Are and When You Should Get OneUltrasounds are used for more than just pregnancy, although that tends to be what most people associate it with. Here, we will discuss ultrasounds and learn what they’re used for, and when we may or may not recommend one.

The ultrasound scan

Sonography (more commonly known as an ultrasound scan), captures images of what is inside a person’s body. Consider a bat or dolphin that uses echolocation to “see” their surroundings. In similar fashion, an ultrasound emits a noise too high pitched for humans to hear, and then records the echoes to determine the shape of organs and soft tissues. This allows for a clear look inside the body without needing an incision.

What do doctors use ultrasounds for?

Ultrasounds look for a variety of things. One of which is pregnancy, of which you’re most likely already aware. During pregnancy, the doctor can see how an unborn baby is progressing. Also, some health issues can be discovered in this manner. For many parents, the sex of the baby can be discovered through use of ultrasound.

But it’s more than just for pregnancy, as mentioned. An ultrasound can detect health problems in a host of internal organs, including:

    • gallbladder
    • kidneys
    • liver
    • ovaries
    • uterus
    • pancreas
    • spleen
    • thyroid
    • testicles
    • bladder
    • eyes
    • heart
    • blood vessels

Some medical procedures also use ultrasound to help in precision, such as needle biopsies.

Advantages of ultrasound imagery

One of the biggest advantages of ultrasounds is that they allow the doctor to see inside a patient without having to make an incision. Ultrasounds are also safe, and do not emit radiation. While x-rays excel at capturing images of bones, they struggle in detecting soft tissues. Ultrasounds do well at capturing images of soft tissues, which is another perk. Finally, ultrasounds are less expensive than other imaging techniques.

Disadvantages of ultrasounds

As with most things, there are a few drawbacks to using an ultrasound. For example, certain areas of the body cannot be imaged using this process. This includes bones and organs where gas is present, such as the lungs. While ultrasounds are great at getting images where x-rays cannot, these images aren’t as detailed, and can sometimes lead to misleading images due to this. The disadvantages are minimal, however, and your doctor will be able to help you understand if this method is best for you.

 

In conclusion, ultrasound scans allow doctors to see organs and soft tissues without being invasive. This is useful for pregnancies and many other medical conditions. Medical technology continues to advance, giving doctors more and more options to diagnose and treat their valued patients safely and effectively. Visit us online for a map to one of our seven locations.

What are the Differences Between a CT Scan and MRI?

What are the Differences Between a CT Scan and MRI?If your doctor requests an advanced imaging scan to aid in making a diagnosis, two of the most common tests requested are the CT Scan and MRI. Let’s take a look at how each of these tests show cross-sectional pictures of the body using different techniques.

CT stands for computerized tomography. This scan uses multiple x-rays that are taken at different angles in order to produce a cross-sectional image. 

MRI stands for magnetic resonance imaging. Here a combination of magnetic fields and radio frequencies are used, so the MRI scanner can generate a 3D image of the part of the body being examined. 

Both of these techniques can be used to examine the same parts of the body, and the choice of which one should be used is based on the possible diagnosis. In general, CT scans are used for diagnosing serious injuries to the head, chest, spine, abdomen, and pelvis, and are helpful when trying to determine if fractures are involved. In contrast, the MRI does a better job of diagnosing issues in joints, tendons, ligaments, and soft tissues. MRIs are often used to scan the brain, spine, neck, breast, abdomen, and muscles. 

 

Differences between a CT Scan and MRI

  • Radiation – CT scans use X-ray technology so minimal radiation exposure is present. CT scans are not usually used during pregnancy for this reason. MRI’s do not involve radiation.
  • Cost – CT scans are usually less expensive than MRI tests.
  • Time for Procedure – CT scans are done fairly quickly. Most CT scans take around 5 minutes to complete. MRI’s can range from 15 minutes to 2 hours depending on the part of the body that is being examined.
  • Patient comfort – CT scans are done in an open machine so concerns about being in a small space are rarely an issue. MRI’s are traditionally done in a narrow tube, and can sometimes cause anxiety. Hampton Roads Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine has an open MRI machine to help with concerns about anxiety if MRI is the best choice for the diagnosis. 
  • Limitations – The table used in CT scans accommodate approximately 300 pounds, so if a larger table is required, a patient may need to go to a facility with appropriate equipment. MRI machines with the conventional tube design may also have limitations based on the size of the patient. Open MRI machines would be an alternative option. In addition, MRI machines utilize magnetic fields during the scan so patients with certain metal objects implanted in the body (e.g. pacemakers, rods, some prosthetic joints, and even certain tattoos) may prevent the use of MRI tests.

 

Your doctor will discuss the type of test that they are considering to make the diagnosis. If you have any questions or concerns please share that with your specialist. Schedule an appointment at one of our seven locations!

What to Expect with Nuclear Medicine Imaging

Radiology Services Virginia Nuclear medicine imagingWhen you hear the term nuclear medicine, there’s a chance you may be a bit concerned with the treatment. After all, nuclear fallout, nuclear weapons, and nuclear meltdowns all have a negative connotation. When it comes to nuclear medicine imaging, however, there is no danger in it.

What is Nuclear Medicine

Nuclear medicine isn’t something you take, like a pain reliever or antibiotic. Rather, it’s simply an imaging process, or a scan. What happens during this scan is a small amount of radioactive material is used, alongside a special camera and computer, to capture images of the insides of your body.

Of course, there are other imaging techniques, so why use nuclear medicine for imaging? Simply stated, because nuclear medicine imaging is able to detect molecular activity with precision, and can discover diseases in their earliest stages, during which time they’re easier to treat.

Preparing for the Exam

Generally speaking, there isn’t a lot you need to do to prepare for a nuclear medicine scan. If, however, the scan will be looking at the stomach, you may be asked to not eat food before coming. Likewise, if the scan is for the kidneys, you may be asked to drink lots of water beforehand. Whatever the case, your radiologist will let you know what you should do before you come in.

What You Should Expect

Most scans will have you lie down on a table. The camera may look like a CT scanner, however it may also be positioned above the table or below the table. While the images are being taken, you must stay as still as possible so as to get the most accurate image. Don’t worry about the radioactivity lingering in your body, either. The majority of it leaves your body through urine and stool. The rest disappears over time, so if you were hoping to gain superpowers like Spider-Man from nuclear medicine, you’re out of luck.

 

If you need nuclear medicine imaging or other radiology services, please schedule an appointment with us at Peninsula Radiology by giving us a call at (757) 989-8830.

The Importance of Regular Breast Cancer Screenings

breast cancer screenings

Cancer is a heartbreaking illness that is very difficult to treat and incredibly painful to go through. Based on 2010-2012 data, 39.6% of Americans are diagnosed with cancer at some point during their lifetime. There are several forms of cancer that can develop many different ways, and a few ways to take breast cancer screenings.

Breast cancer is a form of cancer that develops from breast tissue. It is most common in women over the age of 40 but also affects younger women as well. Men also have a risk of developing breast cancer, although the rate of breast cancer seen in men is far lower than the rate of breast cancer seen in women. In the United States, less than 5 percent of women with breast cancer are younger than 40. Breast cancer rates are highest among women over the age of 70. With any form of cancer, it is better to detect the problem earlier on before it escalates further and becomes harder to treat.

There are several ways to check if breast cancer is present. One way to check yourself for breast cancer is to do a self-examination once a month. Self-examination is the process of an individual looking for physical or visual changes in the breasts. To do a self-examination, your breasts should be dry and there should be no lotions or other similar products on your fingers. Find a comfortable couch or bed and lay down flat on your back. Use the pads, not the tips, of your index, middle, and ring fingers. Start from the outer areas of the breast and work your way towards the center, carefully feeling for any lumps that might exist. If you feel anything, do not panic, for many of these lumps turn out to be non-cancerous.

Self-examinations are just one way to check for breast cancer, but the best and most effective way to screen yourself for breast cancer is by making an appointment with your doctor and scheduling a mammogram or breast ultrasound. Even if no lumps are felt by the self-examination, women over the age of 40 should schedule these breast cancer screenings regularly. Always keep an eye on your health and be sure to check with your doctor if you come across anything concerning. The best way to fight cancer is to detect it early.

Peninsula Radiology urges you to do a monthly breast self exam.  If you or a family member require guidance to find a qualified breast health specialist in your area, please contact one of our seven locations for help.  

What Is a PET Scan?

PET ScanPeninsula Radiology offers multiple diagnostic tests that are intended to diagnose diseases that are hidden from the naked eye.  While many people know the names of the different types of tests and scans, most do not know what the scans are intended to do.  One of the types of tests that is commonly performed at Peninsula Radiological Associates is a PET scan.

What is a PET scan?

A positron emission tomography, more commonly known as PET, is a type of procedure used to scan for possible diseases inside of your body. It uses gamma rays given off by a tracer to make a 3D image of the interior of your body possible. The way this works is that you are given the tracer, which is swallowed or injected, and it gives off low levels of radiation that the machine can pick up on, allowing it to map the inside of your body. It is a painless procedure, and has few risks associated with it. At the longest, the radiotracer will be out of your system within a day.

Why get a PET scan?

It’s an easy procedure that can detect and measure numerous things about the body, with the most important and often the most relevant being your oxygen use and blood flow. The scan is simple and non-invasive.

Why a PET scan over something else?

A lot of very dangerous diseases can be detected earlier with the aid of a PET scan, from cancer to brain disorders. The test can give you early warning for life-threatening diseases.  It can also detect the stages of heart disease, and can prevent stroke and heart attacks if the disease is found early.

In short, a PET scan is a relatively easy test to perform that can help to diagnose life threatening health situations. If your doctor recommends it, then it is a procedure that could very well save your life.

If you have been advised or referred for a PET scan, contact our office for an appointment with one of our radiology professionals.  Our team of providers has the experience and skill to provide outstanding health services in a compassionate, caring environment.

 

Concussions

concussionA concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury that is caused by a blow to the head or body, a fall, or another injury that jars or shakes the brain inside the skull. Concussions are a concern for young athletes in sports that involve contact. Signs and symptoms generally show up soon after the injury. However, you may not know how serious the injury is at first and some symptoms may not show up for hours or days. Monitoring an injured child or adult is essential to recognizing symptoms that require medical care.  Diagnosing a concussion through the appropriate imaging testing, such as those done at Peninsula Radiology, is the most accurate form of diagnosis.

 

Common Causes of Concussion

There are many ways to get a concussion. Some common ways include

  • fights
  • falls
  • playground injuries
  • car accidents
  • bike accidents
  • Participating in any sport or activity such as:
    • football
    • soccer
    • boxing
    • hockey
    • skiing
    • snowboarding

 

Symptoms of a Concussion

It is not always easy to tell if you have a concussion. You don’t have to pass out (lose consciousness) to have a concussion. Symptoms of a concussion range from mild to severe and can last for hours, days, weeks, or even months. If you notice any symptoms of a concussion, contact your doctor. Physical symptoms of a concussion include:

 

  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Headache and pressure in head
  • Fuzzy or blurry vision
  • Dizziness
  • Sensitivity to light or noise
  • Balance problems
  • Feeling tired or having no energy

 

How is a concussion diagnosed?

You need to see a doctor if you have sustained an injury or blow to the head and are showing symptoms of a concussion. If a doctor thinks that you have a concussion, he or she will ask questions about the injury. Your doctor may test your reflexes and order a CT Scan or an MRI to make sure the brain is not swelling, bleeding or bruised.

 

Treatment for a Concussion

The treatment for a concussion involves resting and abstaining from all physical activity until your doctor has determined it is safe. Rest is the best way to recover from a concussion. Getting plenty of sleep and avoiding activities that are mentally and physically demanding will hasten your recovery rate.

 

Preventing Concussions

Experts agree that the best ways to prevent concussion are to:

  • Play by the rules. Teaching young athletes to respect and follow the rules of their sport is part of good coaching.
  • Wear the appropriate equipment for your sport and wear it properly. Always close a chin strap if your sport requires a helmet; many concussions occur during practice.
  • Examine the playing field for uneven areas or holes.
  • Make certain that goal posts are padded sufficiently.
  • Practice good sportsmanship. Teaching good sportsmanship is part of good coaching and good parenting; minimizing unnecessary aggression on the field.
  • Learn and use proper technique for your sport. Some sports organizations have taken additional action to minimize the risk of concussion by limiting the number of contact practices allowed during the season.

If you’ve suffered any of the above causes of concussion and are showing symptoms, it is vitally important to seek medical care.  Peninsula Radiology’s team of highly trained imaging professionals and medical providers are able to diagnose concussion after a thorough review of imaging tests.  Contact us at (757) 989-8830 for more information.

 

The Musculoskeletal System Explained

musculoskeletalThe musculoskeletal system is the network of muscles and bones within the body. Injuries, conditions like arthritis, and other growth and degeneration problems can cause pain and disorders that cannot always be identified with a physical exam. It is a musculoskeletal radiologist’s job to conduct medical imaging of the problem areas to figure out what is happening to your body.

Musculoskeletal problems can be the result of anything from work accidents and sports injuries to genetics and lifestyle choices, and many other circumstances. Some of these problems include osteoarthritis of the knee, osteoporosis of the bones, and other joint or muscle issues.

In order to accurately diagnose and treat Musculoskeletal Conditions, Peninsula Radiology offers a full spectrum of imaging services. Our radiologist utilize CTMRI, musculoskeletal ultrasound, bone biopsies and bone mineral density studies to effectively look inside of a patient’s body. Since musculoskeletal disorders and injuries affect bones and muscles specifically, this is where these kinds of radiologists focus their attention. Thanks to these technologies and our expert staff, we are able to diagnose a wide range of disorders of the musculoskeletal system.

Our Musculoskeletal Imaging Radiologists work closely with our other departments to ensure that every diagnosis is accurate and that treatment plans for musculoskeletal conditions are the most effective available.

Conditions that fall in the range of Musculoskeletal Imaging include patients with the following:

  • Patients with disorders of the spine, upper & lower extremities
  • Arthritis
  • Cancers of the soft tissues & bones

For more than 50 years, Peninsula Radiological Associates has provided quality medical imaging services. Our team of board certified and fellowship-trained radiologists have over 200 years of combined experience.  As a team we deliver the most comprehensive range of medical diagnostic imaging and interventional radiological procedures available on the Virginia Peninsula.

At Peninsula Radiology, it is our goal to always utilize the least invasive technology for diagnosis. We only advance to more complex procedures when it is necessary. Call (757) 595-6363 or go online to schedule an appointment for imaging services.

What is Nuclear Medicine?

nuclear medicineWhat is Nuclear Medicine

Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that is used to diagnose and treat diseases in a safe and painless way. It uses small amounts of radioactive material are used to diagnose and treat a variety of diseases. The procedures that are used are able to pinpoint molecular activity within the body, and therefore offer the potential to identify disease in its earliest stages.

When is Nuclear Medicine Used? 

Molecular imaging procedures are used to diagnose and manage the treatment :

  • Cancer
  • Heart disease
  • Brain disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease
  • Gastrointestinal disorders
  • Lung disorders
  • Bone disorders
  • Kidney and thyroid disorders,  and more.

What are the Benefits of Nuclear Medicine?

  • Examinations provide details on both function and anatomic structure of the body that is often unattainable using other imaging procedures.
  • For many diseases, scans provide the most useful information needed to make a diagnosis or to treatment plan.
  • less expensive than exploratory surgery.
  • Offers the potential to identify disease in its earliest stage, often before symptoms occur or abnormalities can be detected with other diagnostic tests.

If you have any questions, please ask your physician. You can find more information about nuclear medicine on our services page. Thank you for choosing Peninsula Radiology for your diagnostic needs!

What is Embolization and is it the Right Choice for You?

embolizationEmbolization is a way of therapeutically cutting off a supply of blood to a particular part of the body. This procedure can be used to prevent internal bleeding, stop the flow of blood to a tumor, treatment of aneurysms or to resolve abnormal connections between veins and arteries. Embolization is a less invasive way to address blood flow concerns than open surgery.

The benefits of embolization include:

  • Less Complications – Given that this is a less invasive procedure than open surgery the risk factors are reduced for patients.
  • No Surgical Incision – This procedure only requires a nick in the skin to insert the catheter and therefore no stitches are required.
  • Brief Hospital Stay – Most people need to stay in the hospital only the night after the procedure. Normal activities can usually begin in approximately one week.
  • Options When Surgery is Not Recommended – This method can be used to treat tumors and other vascular issues that can’t be removed surgically or would pose too great of a risk if surgery was attempted.

The procedure is done with the aid of x-ray imaging and a contract material so the blood vessel can be seen clearly. The doctor inserts a catheter into the blood vessel and moves it up to the area that needs to be treated. The catheter is a long, thin plastic tube that fits inside the vein or artery, it is approximately 1/8 inch in diameter so you can compare it to being smaller than a pencil lead used in a mechanical pencil. Once the catheter is positioned properly an embolic agent is inserted through the catheter and this synthetic material or medication is placed for the treatment.

Different types of embolic agents can be used depending on the size of the blood vessel and whether the agent need to be a permanent or temporary solution.
Embolization can provide treatment for a variety of medical needs, so discuss your particular situation with the doctor and they can answer your questions about the benefits and risks of their recommended course of treatment.

Embolization can be performed by the providers of Peninsula Radiology Associates. If your doctor has recommended embolization as the appropriate procedure for you, and you would like more information, please contact us at (757) 989-8830. We would be happy to help you decide if it’s right for you!